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High-risk Investments and Retirement Gifts

Everyone knows that the perfect retirement gift to give to oneself is a formidable retirement plan. Nowadays, the American market is struggling with the housing bubble and is only able to get meager gains; this means that stocks are being valued less than one wants it to be. One may look towards high-risk investments like oil-well partnerships, direct investments and foreign currency ETFs to get the superior gains to offset the weak gains of traditional investments. And if deep inside, you’re a daredevil, you may venture into hedge funds target to retirement investors or mutual funds that make use of hedge fund strategies to help future retirees generate sufficient income come 65. But given the falling market and the benefits (and huge risks) that these kinds of investments present, should one venture into these? Before we answer that question, let’s look deeper in the world of these “sophisticated” investments. The Roller-Coaster World of Hedge-Funds If you’ve only read about the good side of hedge funds, you’ve probably heard about the superstar investors behind them that get paid huge sums by clients and assure superior gains in their investments in return, regardless if stock prices are rising or falling.

But the problem is, finding these superstars is a huge issue, since consistent performance isn’t assured, given the complexity of the investing world. Yes, it may contribute a lot from the outset, but the chances of continued returns are unlikely. Also, hedge funds are very unreliable in the sense that they lag behind others in terms of “survivorship bias”, which means that hedge fund database don’t include the returns of business that have flamed out or have simply stopped posting results. One should also consider the great difficulty in handling these kind of funds. Great timing is needed especially in ETFs that let you buy and sell foreign currencies, which helps you profit from ups and downs in the market.

This entails extensive reading of events in other countries and finding one that has high currency volatility in order to get the best return possible. High Costs You probably haven’t heard about the costs of being a hedge fund owner. These funds usually charge around 1 to 2 percent of assets plus 20 percent or more from profits in these funds. If you spend on a fund that spreads its assets on numerous hedge funds, you’ll also pay fees for each hedge fund involved. This system of charging clients simply decreases the always-hyped returns that hedge funds give. Given the huge fixed costs of these investments, it is likely that one day you might find yourself with big losses from investing too much on these. So to speak, this might damage your retirement than fully enhance it. Stick to the Basics With all the problems and costs associated with these kinds of investments, it is still better to ignore their tempting call and stick to mutual funds. Of course, they pay lower fees compared to the astronomical ones in the carnival-esque world of high-risk investing. Yes, these “basic” investments still involve risk, but tracking corporations is way easier than keeping watch of foreign currencies and economies.

In the long run, the seemingly little gains that you get from these simple investments may pile up into something that’s enough to spend your final years in life with a Cristal in hand. .


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